Involving Young People as Partners in Mental Health Research

Speakers: Dr Magenta Simmons, Youth Partnerships in Research Coordinator at Orygen and Melissa Keller-Tuberg, Youth Mental Health Advocate

In 2021, the Melbourne Social Equity Institute has launched a new seminar series as part of its Mental Health and Society Research Program.

In the third event in this series, Dr Magenta Simmons and Melissa Keller-Tuberg will speak about partnerships in youth mental health research.

Youth mental health research can be meaningfully improved through the involvement of young people as partners.

The unique contributions of young people throughout all stages of the research process can help improve the quality and value of research activities, from setting research priorities through to translating findings back into practice and policy.

This talk will discuss some of the barriers and enablers to creating and sustaining successful partnerships between young people and researchers.

This event will commence at 1pm AEST on Thursday 6 May – see other time zones.

Dr Magenta Simmons is a Senior Research Fellow and the Youth Partnerships in Research Coordinator at Orygen and the Centre for Youth Mental Health at The University of Melbourne. Her work focuses on how young people can be meaningfully involved as collaborators in research projects, in clinical decision making about their own mental health care, and as peer workers supporting other young people through peer support

Melissa Keller-Tuberg is a youth mental health advocate and aspiring researcher studying a Bachelor of Psychology (Honours) at Swinburne University of Technology. After recovering from her own mental health issues and experiencing the limitations in current services, Melissa became involved in youth mental health constancy across a range of organisations and settings, including on Orygen’s Youth Research Council (YRC) and Research Review Committee (RRC). She advocates that the system must give those it seeks to serve a voice in policy, research and clinical programs in order for those programs to work.

We acknowledge the Wurundjeri people and other peoples of the Kulin nation as the traditional owners of the land on which our work in the community takes place. We pay our respects to their Elders past and present.

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